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Do you want to offset your bill 100% or 90%?

asked 2017-02-03 15:01:50 -0600

jeff-reichmuth gravatar image

Do you want to offset your bill 100% or 90%?

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answered 2017-06-30 16:29:40 -0600

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updated 2017-06-30 16:29:40 -0600

Ideally, you would create a "Net Zero" system which would offset your electric bill 100%. You create as much power as you consume, so there is no electric bill to pay. You would still get a bill for having the grid connection, but where I live its like $10/month. It's well worth it since you need power at night and can easily offset that power during the day (especially during the longer days in the summer) by selling back your excess power.

Where I live, if you create more than you used, the excess carries forward to the next month as a credit with the electric company. In the summer you build credits since days are longer. In the winter when the days are shorter, you'll produce less during the day and use more grid power at night but those credits keep it all balanced. After one year, if you still have any credits the electric company pays you cash $$$ for the excess Kwh you produced and delete those credits and the process starts over for the next year.

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answered 2017-09-17 21:20:06 -0600

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updated 2017-09-17 21:20:06 -0600

leland-gohl gravatar image

The more panels you can produce from solar, the better. Keep in mind that 90-100% projection is likely based on your last year's consumption. If there's room to lower that consumption, then the total system at 90% could cover everything you need.

Here's a few things to consider: - Do you have energystar appliances? - Leaving AC/heating on at ridiculous temperatures? At night? - Do you have CFLs/LEDs? - An electric car? - What about phantom power, the power that's lost when your devices stay plugged in even when loss? Some reports conservatively put this amount at 15% of our electric bills.

Hope this helps.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/lelandgohl/ (Leland)

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Asked: 2017-02-03 15:01:50 -0600

Seen: 922 times

Last updated: Sep 17 '17